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Showing posts with the label famous typewriters

Close Encounters at the Mesa Typewriter Exchange

I was on the phone with the unsinkable Bill Wahl from the Mesa Typewriter Exchange and he told me a story about a celebrity sighting in the store. 

I guess Mr. Brown stopped by last thursday and brought a very nice Olympia that was in the shop. Pretty cool.
You might ask why I called. Well, the 7th Phoenix Type-In is in the works and a date is forthcoming. Regardless, it will probably be later this summer. Keep your ear to the typebars for more information.

Happy Birthday, Tennessee

From Wikipedia: Thomas Lanier "Tennessee" Williams III (March 26, 1911 – February 25, 1983) was an American writer who worked principally as a playwright in the American theater. He also wrote short storiesnovelspoetryessaysscreenplays and a volume of memoirs. His professional career lasted from the mid-1930s until his death in 1983, and saw the creation of many plays that are regarded as classics of the American stage. Williams adapted much of his best known work for the cinema.

'I’d love to use my typewriter again' Ray Bradbury, 1920-2012

I was saddened to hear of Ray Bradbury's passing. He was 91 and succumbed to a long illness following a stroke in 2002. I was reminded of a small section of a post I wrote about a year ago: My Sophomore classes are reading Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury. In the Afterword Bradbury describes how he considers F.451 a dime-novel. It cost him $9.80 in dimes to write at a coin-operated Remington or Underwood. He needed a place to type and the basement of UCLA's library prevented him from wanting to play with his children rather than working on his novel. He indicates that the time constraint really helped him write.
Born in Waukegan, Illinois in 1920 Ray Bradbury moved with his family to Los Angeles, California. He graduated from Los Angeles High School in 1938. He spent his days at home writing and his nights reading in the library. In 1947 a collection of his stories were published in a volume titled Dark Carnival. But it wouldn't be until The Martian Chronicles was publishe…