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Three Red Keys

Before I get into the meat, let's start with the bread. I didn't make it to the Ink and Bean. We had planned to take the little diversion, but circumstances always make for new plans. As we returned from our last evening at Disneyland, Mrs. Magic Margin stepped off the shuttle and wrenched her ankle. She was in pain and I hadn't the heart to make her go to a coffee house, grab a cup of joe, talk typewriters, and relax while her ankle was throbbing. As it was, we had to alter our plan to go to the beach ultimately deciding to head back to the valley. She is getting better by degrees.

The disappointment at missing a chance to go to such a happening hot-spot was tempered by a gift from a colleague. Early Tuesday our bookstore manager came by with this typewriter in tow.


If you are a fan of Will Davis' blog, this will seem very familiar. It is, in fact the same model Webster that was featured in a nuts-and-bolts analysis of all its peccadilloes. As soon as it showed up you could see eyes looking over in the direction of this blue beauty. Three red keys. THREE RED KEYS! One red key is fantastic. You multiply that by three and you have three times the red key pressing fun.

As for this little typewriter, it's the same quality that you see in all metal-bodied Brother typewriters. These are quality machines and if you are looking to set up a CTP cell in your neighborhood you might want to arm the faithful with these little machines. 

So, that's about it. Not much else to share. Things are going slowly here at CTP HQ. Students are tapping away. The typewriters are humming along nicely. The only rumble is the unfortunate press that Arizona has received as a result of some very silly thinking down at the state legislature. Live and let type is what I always say. 

Comments

  1. Sorry to hear about Mrs. Magic Margin. I hope all heals well for her. Disney is often in the news here with people getting hurt and even killed.

    Nice looking typewriter.

    Good to hear the students are tapping away.

    ReplyDelete
  2. In the winter of 2009 my left knee was throbbing with pain and afterwards the knee look like a ham in the mornings. So the doc said you have arthritis and it will travel from your left side to your right side. I hope Mrs. Magic Margin don't have to use stairs in the house because it's a killer! I hope her condition does not get as bad! Anyway when I saw the Brother XL-800 on Will Davis' "Brother, Smith-Corona Interchangeable Type" (video) I knew I had to get one. So far I have purchase an XL-500 but still looking. Those interchangeable type-face on your machine are great! Enjoy

    ReplyDelete
  3. Nice Bro, Bro!

    May the Mrs heal quick, and hope you had a bunch of fun at the Magic Kingdom, despite missing the Bean. (:

    ReplyDelete
  4. Looks just like my Brother Charger 11, and the Montgomery Ward Signature 100, except they don't have the cool red keys
    Of course, what would we do without our Royals!

    ReplyDelete

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