Wednesday, September 25, 2013

The List

So here is the list of machines I came up with for the GCC North exhibition. I have had to make some tough editorial decisions, but I would love to hear  from you. How complete or incomplete is this list? I have tried to represent a century of typewriter evolution. Does this collection pull that off?

1909 Corona 3
1921 Underwood Standard Portable
1926 Remington 12
1935 Remington Model 7
1937 Corona Standard
1942 Royal Arrow Navy Radio Mill
1954 Royal HH
1959 Olympia SG-1
1959 Olympia SM3
1961 Brother Valiant
1961 IBM Selectric
1985 IBM Wheelwriter 5

14 comments:

  1. I think it's an excellent representation. I might add something funky like a Blick or Oliver to show how different form factors died out. And maybe one of the late S-C portables to show how they became household items.

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    1. Actually - scratch that second one. The Brother does a nice job of that.

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    2. I do have a very aged Oliver in original unrestored condition. I wonder if that might not be a good representation. Unfortunately, I sold my Blick. Mainly, because it was haunted and gave me the willies.

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  2. I think it would be advantageous if you displayed a typewriter that's boldly coloured to show that not all of them were either black or softer colours. To the non-typewriter-person that might be more important than we think? Maybe. Just a suggestion.

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    1. Yep - when non-typewriter folks view my modest collection, they always comment that they didn't realize typewriters were made in colors. The Valentine, of course, is a great example as well as bold design. When I first began collecting, and knew even less than I do now, the desire was for red, red, red.

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  3. You have a great selection of practical machines but I can see what Nick is saying about a lack of 'connecting' pieces. That said, starting off the evolution of typewriters with your oldest being a portable gives a good start to what the focus of development was at the start of the 20th century, but doesn't give you an idea of what it was evolving from.

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  4. It's a great list, but just like Erik I'm missing typewriters with different mechanisms. A bold color might also help people connect to the machine itself.

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    1. Color? I have both colors; brown and black. What other colors could there even be out there? Blue. I'm not some sort of hippie.

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  5. Maybe substitute the Oliver for the HH, if you've reached your numerical limit.

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  6. Decisions, decisions. I'd probably pick the dozen with the fanciest paint jobs and suffer the consequence of not being entirely representative. But that's a good cross section you have! Maybe one too many electrics? Yep, I'd ditch the wheelriter and if you have an Oliver...

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    1. Most of my machines are black and shiny. That's how I like my typewriters. My personal collection is heavily skewed to that lat 20s to early 40s. Not too many colors in the lot. I like the conversation/consternation the selections have caused in the comments, though.

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  7. I see at least three of my personal favorites... but I think the display could use a little Italian design somewhere; how about including a Olivetti somewhere along the 1960s stage?

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  8. Good list! I agree that color and interesting mechanisms probably will be worth more to the eyeballs of onlookers. I'd also swap the WW for an Oliver, and maybe get your maroon corona in there somewhere. Also, where's the Silver Surfer L22? :D

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  9. Good comments, everyone. I was asked (by the hosts) to include a typewriter that might be in the memories of the students that go to school there. The Wheelwriter fits the bill. I also had the challenge of space, but my hosts are overjoyed and I think even the plastic mid-eighties has its own charm.

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