Saturday, April 13, 2013

November 1956

I found this interesting document and thought I would share it with the Typosphere. Royal's human resources department published this monthly magazine for the benefit of its workforce. While typewriters are present, this magazine primarily lets us have a glimpse inside the everyday life at a major typewriter manufacturer during the 1950s. 

The people who worked at Royal were not typewriter users like us. They worked for Royal and were probably loyal to their employer, but typewriters were not the cultural artifacts they are today.  No doubt, they would thing that owning more than one typewriter was just plain unusual.

Typewriters were devices intended to do a job. So, within these pages you'll see no mention of the power of unplugging from the digital hegemony or any of the usual tropes of the Typosphere. Instead you'll find celebrations of birthdays, information on major medical plans, and pictures of employee barbecues. You might even see the odd typewriter here-and-there. 



9 comments:

  1. This is quite fascinating. Particularly the approach to workplace safety. It almost seems absurd, looking backwards, that typewriters themselves are barely mentioned.

    Also, the anniversaries section is interesting. 10 years at a company almost seems absurd these days, let alone 20.

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  2. It would appear that they had some slip and fall issues. That isn't surprising where machine oil would be involved.

    Scott has a good point. I've been at the same company for over 20 years but have changed my job description and career as I went along. I am an anomaly in a world where 5 years at the same place in the private sector is a long time.

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  3. Really neat, thanks for posting.

    I want a mink typewriter!! (p. 6)

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  4. The publication is great. I too like the anniversary section. Many companies no longer last 10 year let alone employees. Companies get bought and even loyal employees get laid-off. The insurance pages are neat.

    Thanks for posting it.

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  5. This is too cool! A little view to the other side of the curtain. Love it!

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  6. That's fantastic. Especially interesting is the little item on the bottom of page 6, about the electric Smith Corona portable. Talk about burying the lede!

    "Oh, and our big domestic competition is launching something that should scare the crap out of upper management."

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  7. I love that sentence in the item about the Smith Corona portable, "It plugs into any wall outlet just like an electric fan or a toaster"!

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  8. When I worked for Remington Rand Chartres there were employees who had been with the company for 40 years, I was at retirement ceremony for one of them. I did see from time to time similar in -house news letters by different companies. It seemed to me that it was mainly an American thing The medical insurance was also peculiar to American companies as I had worked for a short time with Simplex and we were all signed up to HCF paid for by the Simples. And in classic American style thay used to hold "booster" meetings to help with "team morale". This was in Melbourne and the techs from out-lying areas like Bairnsdale and Mildura were expected to attend. Having travelled many hundreds of kilometres and goodness knows how many hours of driving they fronted up and with-in the hour the meeting was over and back thay would go! The irony of it all was that everyone had to complete a work docket detailing each and every job that one performed that day and the hours had to add up to eight. This was in the interest ofsaving time and effort. You could not make this up,it was just so mind-bending, needless to say I did not last very long there.

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  9. This article was really very nice. sLIP AND FALL

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