Thursday, December 13, 2012

57% Typewriters

In addition to my duties teaching English, I am also the Newspaper and Yearbook adviser. It is my job to make sure that the budding journalists of Alhambra work hard and get the news out. We have just finished with our second edition (No. 2) of the school newspaper, the Scimitar. 



Getting a school newspaper out is not easy. Keeping teens focused on what is newsworthy and what is just junk takes some deftness. Also, our news cycle is a month long. That makes some of our stories a little old by press time, but the experience of working on a paper newspaper is one that they won't have anywhere else. Last year's editor is now at the Cronkite School at Arizona State University working on her journalism degree.

As proud as I am of my students for putting together such a great edition, I am also proud to say that over 1/2 of the stories in this newspaper began as drafts written on a typewriter. They have been edited and edited again digitally, but they began as typewritten stories. Anyway, if you are interested in a copy, send your address to adney@phoenixunion.org and I'll pop a free copy in the mail.

I know that no one in the Typosphere is opposed to a paper newspaper, but every once and a while a colleague says, "You should just put that on-line. It's so much easier." That makes me cringe. If it was so easy to do the New York Times would have just gone all digital. For some markets all-digital makes sense, but for my market it does not. We are a small monthly with a circulation of 1000. The adviser before me tried to do an on-line only newspaper and that went over like a lead balloon. No one read the on-line newspaper because it was on-line. So, as long as I am the adviser, we will have a paper newspaper.

11 comments:

  1. Paper all the way!
    I'm the 'Editor of News' of our school's newspaper and we're still faithfully paper; but we're looking to venture online a little bit, but we're not deserting print.
    Like the Alhambra Scimitar most of my stories begin on a trusty manual typewriter, a symbol of times gone past when journalism was quality and facts were accurate. It is so nice to hear that there are student news stories beginning the same way on the other side of the world.

    ReplyDelete
  2. As a former member of the Mesa High Newspaper staff and Yearbook staff in the 1980's, I say *SOLIDARITY, BROTHER!* Keep the Paper on paper :D

    ReplyDelete
  3. You're doing it the right way, of course. And you have the coolest newspaper name ever. Go Moors!

    ReplyDelete
  4. I think you're right, Ryan.
    == Michael Höhne

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Now that is a phrase I do not often hear. Thanks for the comment!

      Delete
    2. If it were perfect, there'd be no room for improvement. Putting in the effort in the first place is itself praiseworthy.

      Delete
  5. Hyphenation on the cover splash and the headline for the lead story is criminal. I hope you get that slipshod typography sorted for issue three! Other than that, well done. Carry on.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I know. It bothered me too, but with all the things I was demanding I thought it a small crime. Far smaller than every word in a headline being misspelled. Yes, that did happen!

      Delete
  6. Newspapers without paper? Never!

    ReplyDelete