Tuesday, November 20, 2012

19 Typewriters

Through my many (three) years of scientific (barely) study of youths and typewriters I have arrived at an optimum number of typewriters for use in an opt-in classroom. 19. Also, the shelves I have hold 19 nicely with room for journal forms. The number is arrived at by a combination of prudence and actual use. So, here are the 19.

With bad photography and all, here are the 19:

Royal QDL, 1950s (Richard Polt donor); Royal QDL, 1950s (Erick Lawson donor)


Royal QDL, 1950s (Erick Lawson donor); Royal QDL, 1950s (Erick Lawson donor)


Royal QDL, 1950s (Erick Lawson donor); Royal Custom III, 1970s (Bill M. donor)


Royal Safari, 1950s (CTP donor); Royal Mercury, 1970s (Erick Lawson donor)


Remington Performer, 1970s (Jen Aschmann donor)


Royal QDL, 1940s (CTP donor); Remington Quiet-Riter, 1950s (Erick Lawson donor)


Olympia B12, 1970s (Richard Polt donor); Olympia B12, 1970s (Bill M. donor)


Olympia SM9, 1960s (Ted Munk donor); Olympia SM3, 1959 (CTP donor)


Tower Presidental, 1950s (Ton Sisson donor); Hermes 3000, 1950s (Kathy Maguire donor)


Brother Eschelon 90, 1970s (Peter Baker donor); Webster XL-500, 1970s(Erick Lawson donor)

What about all the other typewriters? Well, I keep them in-reserve should anything happen to the ones I have out in rotation. With as much use as these typewriters get, I have been able to come to some conclusions about certain brands and their ruggedness. 

As you can see, there are few Smith-Corona typewriters. They seem to just wilt under pressure. The typebar linkages are openable so those typewriters tend to fail in that one area. All the Smith-Corona Galaxie-like machines currently have a problem with their linkages as a result of this tendency and await repair.

Brother typewriters are remarkably durable and able to withstand heavy use. They are easy to repair and have both precision manufacturing and the ability to be "formed" when needed.

1950s Royals are plentiful and cheap. When they are in good shape, they type well. When they are junkers, boy are they pitiful typers. All of the escapements on the CTP Royals are good. There tends to be little skipping when the typist has a good rhythm, but any time the typeist is out-of-sych with the machine, chaos ensues.

Things are going well with the CTP. We are treading the typing waters here. No revelations or grand schemes are in the works. There have been rumblings about a 4th Phoenix Type-In. We'll see if something cool happens with that.

6 comments:

  1. I think so. I also want to make it a larger event. More in line with what PhillyTyper does, but out here in the West!

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  2. The QDLs seem to be the dominant species.

    Those linkages on Smith-Coronas are weak points, true, although I've never had one fail on me.

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    1. I agree with Richard. The link connections are themselves not under any great strain, but if the clamping spring gets mal-formed the link will come loose. Try "forming" the the leaf spring so that it wants to "pinch" then you will find that your problem will be solved. If you find that there is a glut of this particular problem then I suggest that you look for outside interference!

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  3. Surprising about the Smith-Coronas. Nice to see all the machines that are used in the CTP.

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  4. Treading water. Better than drowning.

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