Sunday, April 10, 2011

Remington Noiseless 7

P.S. I found out from Richard's site that the plastic keytops are original, not after-market "updates".








7 comments:

  1. Aw, sweet! We both get some typewriter love this weekend! (:

    Hmmn, another glass-key machine that someone thought would look better with aftermarket plastic keys. I always find that conversion baffling, but maybe it made sense back then.

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  2. Actually, the plastic keys are original to the RN7. Check out the image. http://site.xavier.edu/polt/typewriters/rem-portables.htm#7 I don;t know why plastic was used other than the novelty and expense. The RN7 was a high-line model. Maybe there was some prestige in having plastic keys.

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  3. There's nothing more satisfying that talking down antique store prices, especially the more stratospheric ones. Gorgeous machine. Love those ribbon spools.

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  4. Congratulations, it's a beauty! My first typewriter (age 12 or so) was and is one of these, and it's the machine that made me love typewriters.

    The bell mechanism, as I recall, depends on a finicky spring that can often get out of whack or broken.

    The platen could be a chance to try the notorious brake fluid treatment ...

    Anyway, good score!

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  5. very pretty. Is it headed for the classroom then? I had a bell that wouldn't ring on the HH and it was just a part I needed to bend.

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  6. Congrats! I lurve the design of the Remy 7. It's a beaut, which is probably why you see so many like it in the movies.

    Heh, "polo pony and trust fund."

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  7. These just beg for a custom paint job. Wide eyes and a huge smile! I think there's something out there (possibly on one of Richard's pages) about new feet. I have used synthetic wine 'corks' which look atrocious but are easily whittled to work well - but only on round-footed machines. I have three square footed Remingtons which are all in need of replacement feet like this.

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