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Showing posts from January, 2014

Dip and Dunk

When a typewriter is so dirty or filled with dried pineapple juice, you sometimes have to take drastic measures. Soapy, drastic measures.


It's the 'old dip-and-dunk.


Vigorous dunking loosens all the dirt. A rinse with hot, hot water comes next. Then, it's off to the oven for a bit of drying. I think 130° F until all the water has evaporated. Oil (ribbon spool posts, carriage rails, shift linkage, other similar parts) while warm and enjoy a very clean typewriter ready for another 60 years.

Without Reservation: Typewriter Recommendations

This post come by way of an email exchange between Richard and myself. The question was what typewriter do I think is best for a classroom environment. I was flattered to be asked, but then I thought about it. My students have typed over 12 million words on the classroom typewriters. These typewriters have been my co-teachers for many years. In that time I have had a chance to stress-test several brands ant there is one that stands out above all the rest due to its low cost, ease of repair, and durability.
At some point we all come to the conclusion that some brands of typewriters fit our needs better than others. That is when we develop personal preferences. I, as you can sense, have an affinity for Royal desktops because here are no finer typewriters to be had. Others bow down at the alter of Olympia. Still others are true-blue Olivetti fans.
Of course, so much depends on the state of the machines when they come to you. I have had some fantastic top-shelf typewriters that have been…

November Lecture Notes

I promised Dr. Polt that the next post would be about my November Lecture. I am the type of lecturer where I create an outline and go from there. It's a by-product of the extemporaneous nature of teaching.
I divided the lecture into two three parts. The first part was a overviews of the Typewriter Renaissance and how it came to be. I spent some time talking about the origins and influences of the movement. The second part was devoted to the CTP and what I have done with typewriters in education. I shared the results of the original experiment and the inventories that came later. I drew some interesting conclusions about student metacognition. This was the largest part of the lecture. The final part was a small survey of the typewriters on display. I picked out some of the more interesting choices and shared their history and importance in the great chain of typewriter being.
Here's a link to a PDF or my notes.
I probably should have recorded the thing, but it was nice to be in…

2013 Review: A Long, Slow Slide