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Showing posts from March, 2013

Corona Sterling #2A 50886

The work on this Corona Sterling Speedline began a while ago; nearly a year as as the original post (http://www.magicmargin.net/2012/04/another-restoration.html) would have it.
This burgundy beauty has been a challenge. The segments were filled with crud and I was able to get the stuff out with carburetor cleaner. I thought everything was fine, but every time I left it overnight the segments would freeze up again. PB blaster didn't help and I got the sinking suspicion that someone previously tried to unfreeze the segments with oil. The oil worked its way deep into the segment block and just would ooze out after I thought I cleaned it out. I eventually got tired of trying and decided to put the machine away and try again at another date.
Days turned into weeks. Weeks turned into months. Typewriters came and went and I didn't get to this one. It wasn't until I started the restoration work–and subsequently was delayed–on the Underwood (see http://www.magicmargin.net/2013/01/…

Happy Birthday, Tennessee

From Wikipedia: Thomas Lanier "Tennessee" Williams III (March 26, 1911 – February 25, 1983) was an American writer who worked principally as a playwright in the American theater. He also wrote short storiesnovelspoetryessaysscreenplays and a volume of memoirs. His professional career lasted from the mid-1930s until his death in 1983, and saw the creation of many plays that are regarded as classics of the American stage. Williams adapted much of his best known work for the cinema.

Crafting & Typewriter Tchotchkes

Like every typewriter collector I have a drawer filled with typewriter-related ephemera; extra spools, case keys, and ribbon tins. Most of the things in this drawer came as extras stuffed in portable cases. A few were gifts from people who know that I like old stuff. I like all of these things and I want to keep them, but displaying ribbon tins is tricky.
That's when I stumbled on this idea that is really simple for you to make at home. While I am sure that someone has thought of this before, I think my method has the added benefit of being very inexpensive.

First, you'll have to get a few things together.
Supplies Roll of adhesive magnetic sheeting ($9.90 for a 18" x 12" roll from Michael's)A picture frame with a glass front no larger than the magnetic sheeting ($3.39 from Target) Metal tchotchkes for display  Steps Take apart the frame by removing the backing and the glass. Do be careful with the glass edges. Depending on how inexpensive your frame it, the edges o…

Select-A-Type

It was a dollar on eBay.


 Here is a radical/pi:


Shipping was free. Actually, shipping was a Forever stamp. So that's good.

We are all familiar with Smith-Corona's more popular changeable types, but here is Royal's version. It's not a changeable type as much as a changeable type bar. 
They look completely unused.


I don't have a typewriter that can use these, but I thought they were strange enough to hazard the bid. Further investigation led me to one small clue at the bottom of this advertisement from around 1956.


It reads:


Could these be the interchangeable type bars mentioned in the ad?

The logo on the case is the same that Royal used all through the McBee years especially on the Safari. I am guessing they are from the 50s or 60s. The "Select-A-Type" typeface makes me think 1950s.
My mind also started thinking about why you don't see more early electric typewriters around? In all these years I have maybe seen 5 Royal electrics from the 50s and only o…

Updated Insurgency Image

Looking at the old image, I noticed there was a little halo of white around the outer black circle. I corrected this problem and it has made all the difference when the logo is on a dark background. So, please take it if you like.

4th Time Around

There must be something in the sunshine that makes this dry and dusty town a nexus for typewriter fans. The luck of the sun...or maybe the Irish was with us because the 4th Phoenix Type-In and Typewriter Round-Up had a record crowd. For softies like me there was an additional "awwww" factor with Jeremiah (10 years old) who had seen the type-in during a rerun of Bill Geist's typewriter story, begged his mom to go, and was committed to "stay to the end."
For Christmas he received a Sear Citation in an ice-white color scheme. It's a great machine and he seemed immensely proud to show it off to other collectors. He had a great time going around and trying out new and different typewriters. He was even lucky enough to go home with another machine in tow; a nice Lettera 32.
The regular mugs were there; Bill Wahl, Theodore, Tori, Brian, Robert, Matt, &c. But there were more than a few new faces including, Alexander, a teen collector who brought his Remington …

See You Today at the Type-In

NBC Filming

A crew from NBC was here today taking a few shots and interviewing some of my students about the typewriters. I have to say the two girls and two boys they interviewed were articulate and very impressive. I snapped this quick pic of the camera and lights. Whenever I find out the air date, I'll let you know.

Unfettered Eager Minds

Even with all the excitement over the 4th Phoenix Type-In, the CTP is still chugging along nicely. It's been a while since I have posted with updated information about the benefit of a typewriter in a classroom setting.
I've done stuff with spelling, and student opinions, but I thought it might be a hoot to look at output as an outcome. I have never subscribed to the "more is better" camp of thought. There is, however, a chance that typewritten output can be an evaluative component of student "on-typewriter" performance vis-a-vis handwritten activities.
I decided to take four random journal prompts from my class that has the highest typewriter user to student ratio; 2:3 for Period 2. I then set about counting the average number of words written by both hand and typewriter. The results were interesting:

Typewriters (students who typewrite their journals) were producing more words per journal than handwriters. Typing for composition is definitely faster th…

Type-In Geekery

The New Times Jackalope Ranch was kind enough to give the Phoenix Type-In scene another accolade in a recent post.



Justified!

ITAM is over, but it seems like Type-In season has just begun:


There is also this thing in Phoenix:

But back to the blog post. In my eternal quest for full typewriter justification, I found this little snippet:

The way that the attachment works is a mystery. From the description is seems that you note the number of spaces that remain on the line after typing. Some sort of pointer and ruler help you do this. In retyping, a knob s allows you to set the number of spaces to drop into the line to fully justify it. Maybe its something that fiddles with the spacer mechanism. The possibilities are very interesting. Maybe this is something that can be replicated if I channel my inner Thomas Edison.